Source Code Infographic, Vera Farmiga SXSW interview

Spoilers ahead: The initial studio-released plot description of Source Code avoids spoiler-y talk of the fictional science within the film, simply noting that Jake Gyllenhaal’s character “cross[es] over into another man’s identity in the last 8 minutes of his life” in order to avert a terrorist attack. But in the weeks leading up to the film’s April 1 release, Summit has increasingly emphasized Source Code’s parallel reality science, and a new poster seems to reveal a few too many clues to what happens in the film.
As depicted in the poster, eight parallel train tracks curved into the same S-shaped path (S for Source Code!) head toward an explosive destination at the eight-minute mark. Ostensibly, the trade-off in hinting at these concepts is that audiences will realize Source Code isn’t just about time travel, a sci-fi conceit that’s been explored exhaustively in other films that have come before. (According to screenwriter Ben Ripley, Source Code’s science is much closer to what real life theoretical physicists suggest is possible.) And of course, how the characters within the film negotiate these parallel tracks and get to the end is what the filmmakers hope will draw audiences in — that, and the prospect of watching Jake Gyllenhaal charm/save his way through the same 8-minute loop for 90 minutes" Source:

It's difficult enough for an actor to work off of another highly animated actor. It is another thing entirely to have to act the majority of a film off of a camera alone. That is where actress Vera Farmiga (The Departed, Up in the Air) found herself in Duncan Jones' Source Code. Vera Farmiga as Carol Goodwin in "Source Code" (2011)

She plays Goodwin - Jake Gyllenhaal's guide and connection to the "outside" as he attempts to uncover first-hand who bombed a train. I had the honor of sitting down with Farmiga at SXSW to discuss working with Duncan, her character, not wanting to look into the camera, and the straight-man approach she took working against Jeffrey Wright's crazy eccentricities. Source: